Skip links

How To Make Up With Friends And Family If You Fell Out Over The EU

The EU referendum has become one of the most bitterly fought political battles in living memory.  The clashes have not just been political, though: Family members, close friends, and co-workers have turned against each other as the campaigns have intensified.

BuzzFeed News spoke to relationship counsellors to ask: Whatever the result of Thursday’s vote, how can people heal relationships torn asunder by the Brexit debate?

Michael Kallenbach relationship therapist

“I know people who’ve fallen out over this. It has divided couples. It’s also divided close friends. I think we’ve all got to respect each other because this is a democratic process and we have to respect people’s choices.

“The difficulty here is that this isn’t a general election and it isn’t reversible, plus the debate has raised all these emotions, so it’s all been very divisive. It’s a great pity in a way that this has happened.

“Couples who have been divided have to think about how they can heal this rift and I’m hoping that after the vote people can be reasonable with each other.

“Cameron is going to have to heal divisions within his party but I don’t know if he’s going to be able to do that. Couples are going to have to do more than that because they live together – Cameron doesn’t live with Mr Gove or Mr Johnson. But Cameron is quite gracious and I imagine he will want to work with people.

“There’s also some anger in the pot and it’s a question of how that’s managed. It might not be something that’s healed overnight – there could be some work to do in the relationship that’s been damaged by this referendum.”

The EU referendum has become one of the most bitterly fought political battles in living memory.

The clashes have not just been political, though: Family members, close friends, and co-workers have turned against each other as the campaigns have intensified.

“reprinted from buzzfeed.com

Join the Discussion